Jung Type Indicator

Complete Personality Type Assessment
Use For
Personal development, team building, coaching and career guidance
Qualification
EFPA Level 2, BPS Certificate of Competence in Occupational
Use With
Adults with a minimum of secondary/high school education.

An alternative to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator ®, the JTI assesses personality within Jung’s framework of Psychological Type. In addition to identifying a person’s preferred Type the JTI uses a scaled approach to each dimension, giving a more detailed description of preference than most Type indicators.

What JTI Measures

The JTI is based on the work of Swiss Psychologist Carl Jung, who identified how our preferences influence how we relate to the world and others around us. Jung’s model of Psychological Type identifies dimensions of preference: Extraversion vs. Introversion (EI), Thinking vs. Feeling (TF) and Sensing vs. Intuiting (SN). The fourth dimension, Judging vs. Perceiving (JP), identifies a person’s dominant preference towards the world as either a judging attitude (T or F) or a perceiving attitude (S or N).

Advantages

Assessing a person’s preferences and how they impact on areas including thinking style, interpersonal styles and problem-solving, the JTI is particularly effective for personal development, enhancing communication, counselling, guidance and team building. Completed in under 10 minutes, yet having excellent reliability and validity, users have the option of paper-and-pencil , online or offline administration and scoring. Emphasising the strengths and developmental challenges of each Psychological Type, the JTI is a valuable tool to facilitate training and development programmes.

The JTI Report

Integrated summary and extended reports are available through the GeneSys Assessment platform. These are written in a style which makes them ideal to give directly to the respondent, and are available to users of both the paper-and-pencil and on-screen JTI. The paper-based JTI includes a simple self-scoring mechanism for respondents to score and profile their own Type in a matter of minutes, and includes summary descriptions of the 16 Types.

Use of both the paper-based and on-screen versions of the JTI are supported by ‘JTI: The Sixteen Types’, a booklet which aids exploration of personal Type preferences through giving respondents full descriptions of the 16 Types, including strengths, interpersonal styles, development needs and career themes.